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Design for Maintainability Articles
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Articles on Design for Maintainability

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Design for Maintainability Human factors engineering can be applied to systems design to minimize the time and effort required to perform periodic preventive maintenance as well as unscheduled maintenance.
Design for Maintainability: The Innovation Process in Long Term Engineering Projects This paper is based upon research relating to two long-term engineering projects from the capital goods industry. They were firstly, ALSTOM Transportís project to supply and maintain a fleet of high-speed tilting trains for Virgin Trains on the West Coast Main Line (WCML) and Clarke Chapmanís contract for the refurbishment, upgrading, operation and maintenance of wharf-side materials handling facilities on behalf of a newly privatised steelworks in Argentina. - requires free Adobe Acrobat Reader for viewing.
Design for the Lifecycle For many durable goods, there are a variety of other design considerations related to the total product life cycle. For consumable products, some of these life cycle factors may be of lesser importance
Designing and Developing Maintainable Products and Systems This document provides information to help the reader view maintainability in the context of an overall systems engineering effort. The handbook defines maintainability, describes its relationship to other disciplines, addresses the basic elements common to all sound maintainability programs, describes the tasks and activities associated with those elements, and provides guidance in selecting those tasks and activities. CAUTION: This file is over 5.5MB in size.
Human Factors/Ergonomics Handbook for the Design for Ease of Maintenance - Part 1 The purpose of this handbook is to provide Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with information that can be used to design equipment and maintenance programs in order to reduce human errors and subsequently accidents and injuries due to human errors with maintenance activities. This handbook provides human factors good practices for design of equipment, systems, subsystems, and facilities, including support facilities and equipment, as well as, guidance for maintenance support equipment and procedures, maintenance aids, and maintenance programs.
Human Factors/Ergonomics Handbook for the Design for Ease of Maintenance - Part 2 The purpose of this handbook is to provide Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with information that can be used to design equipment and maintenance programs in order to reduce human errors and subsequently accidents and injuries due to human errors with maintenance activities. This handbook provides human factors good practices for design of equipment, systems, subsystems, and facilities, including support facilities and equipment, as well as, guidance for maintenance support equipment and procedures, maintenance aids, and maintenance programs.
Human Factors/Ergonomics Handbook for the Design for Ease of Maintenance - Part 3 The purpose of this handbook is to provide Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with information that can be used to design equipment and maintenance programs in order to reduce human errors and subsequently accidents and injuries due to human errors with maintenance activities. This handbook provides human factors good practices for design of equipment, systems, subsystems, and facilities, including support facilities and equipment, as well as, guidance for maintenance support equipment and procedures, maintenance aids, and maintenance programs.
Improving Maintenance by Reducing Human Error This article discussed various techniques to reduce human error in maintenance, with explicit discussion of maintainability improvement techniques - requires free Adobe Acrobat Reader for viewing.
Maintainability The cost of maintaining a machine is a direct function of the maintenance frequency and failure interval for the machine and major components, the time and labor required to complete unscheduled maintenance actions, and the time and labor required to complete routine maintenance tasks. Because of the steadily increasing costs of maintaining underground mining equipment, mining companies have generally focused on ways to contain these costs. These cost control efforts have usually centered on optimizing scheduled maintenance operations, reducing maintenance staffs, better control of spare parts inventories, use of contract maintenance support, and deferring nonessential maintenance. Improved equipment design for maintenance can positively influence all these efforts.
Maintainability Design for maintainability requires a product that is serviceable (must be easily repaired) and supportable (must be cost-effectively kept in or restored to a usable condition). Better yet if the design includes a durability feature called reliability (absence of failures) then you can have the best of all worlds.
Maintainability Design Checklist This checklist is a summary of design review points for the maintainability of new or existing underground equipment. It specifically focuses on the equipment design features, tasks, or procedures that impact equipment downtime, repair costs, labor hours, and maintainer skill level requirements. - requires free Adobe Acrobat Reader for viewing.


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